If a holomorphic function $f$ has modulus $1$ on the unit circle, why does $f(z_0)=0$ for some $z_0$ in the disk?

I don’t understand the final step of an argument I read.

Suppose $f$ is holomorphic in a neighborhood containing the closed unit disk, nonconstant, and $|f(z)|=1$ when $|z|=1$. There is some point $z_0$ in the unit disk such that $f(z_0)=0$.

By the maximum modulus principle, it follows that $|f(z)|<1$ in the open unit disk. Since the closed disk is compact, $f$ obtains a minimum on the closed disk, necessarily on the interior in this situation.

But why does that imply that $f(z_0)=0$ for some $z_0$? I’m aware of the minimum modulus principle, that the modulus of a holomorphic, nonconstant, nonzero function on a domain does not obtain a minimum in the domain. But I’m not sure if that applies here.

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